Viewing: Fairdale

14 Apr Adventure in a box: Day 5 North of Honolua Bay, through Lahaina to Paia from Fairdale

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The route in early morning light.  What a great way to start the day.

The route in early morning light. What a great way to start the day.

What a night with the rain, but waking up to one hell of a view is a great way to start the day.  I took some time to enjoy the desolate road, and to marvel at the landscape and the open ocean stretching as far as the eye could see.  From here I made my way towards Honolua Bay.

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The route can just be seen in the distance.

The route can just be seen in the distance.

With all the rain it was a little too brackish for decent swimming but made my way down a muddy path and carried my bike through a fast moving creek, justifying the decision to roll the dice carrying a bike with a camera across this by telling myself the tires needed to get washed off anyway.

Self portraits along the way.

Self portraits along the way.

Without a shoulder, making that corner is a good idea.

Without a shoulder, making that corner is a good idea.

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This reminds me of my old back road Americana.

This reminds me of my old back road Americana.

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The awe inspiring forest near Honolua bay, and at a total of two, more selfies that I’ve taken in the last 10 years.

The awe inspiring forest near Honolua bay, and at a total of two, more selfies that I’ve taken in the last 10 years.

The forest here was out of this world, so I climbed a tree and kicked it for a bit.  Shot a couple photos and got back on the road.  Continuing the journey towards Lahaina, I wrapped around a corner and saw my world was about to change.  I’d been seeing a lot of natural beauty the past few days, and the sight I saw wrapping around a left hand corner was a towering contrast that couldn’t be ignored.  Massive four star hotels and perfectly manicured golf courses that didn’t seem to fit in with the landscape.

How’s that song go, the sign says? things about to change.

How’s that song go, the sign says? things about to change.

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Taking a scenic detour to take it all in...

Taking a scenic detour to take it all in…

...and not a bad place to fix a flat.

…and not a bad place to fix a flat.

Entering Lahaina I was forced to stop to fix the first of two flats for the day, but flatted out in a spot with a view, so no complaints there.  From here I made my way towards Lahaina’s front street bustling with shops, tourists, and a few interesting characters I passed.  After a nice ocean swim and some time to enjoy the day, it was getting towards that time where I had to reluctantly acknowledge that day 5 was halfway through and I needed to start the grind back to where I’d started.

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Making a few friends along the way.

Making a few friends along the way.

You asked for palm trees, you got palm trees.

You asked for palm trees, you got palm trees.

Lahaina front street.

Lahaina front street.

Banana trees, coconuts behind them and an ocean background.  Dude, where’s my skyscraper?

Banana trees, coconuts behind them and an ocean background. Dude, where’s my skyscraper?

Taking a side road to avoid the highway for a bit.

Taking a side road to avoid the highway for a bit.

After a few last photos to remember the trip by, I began the against the wind pedal back towards where I’d started, and where the airport is located.  It had been a super fun last five days, and thanks to Fairdale for the opportunity to go on the ride.

 

-Ryan Worcester.

Giving the front wheel a break before getting into cruise mode back to where I came from.

Giving the front wheel a break before getting into cruise mode back to where I came from.

11 Apr Adventure In A BOX: Day 4 from Fairdale

Paia town isn’t board of surfing.

Paia town isn’t board of surfing.

Day 4

After hiding from the rain for the night, I awoke to stormy clouds but it wasn’t raining!  I looked at some NOAA weather models for the day, and it looked like I was going to get wet.  Most likely really wet.  So I bought some zip lock bags as extra insurance that all my gear would stay dry and after a couple quick stops got back on the road.

day4My planned route is essentially a figure-eight of the island and it’s two volcanic masses with connecting isthmus, and this leg passed through Kahului before connecting with highway 340 going counterclockwise around the west side of the island.

The type of character that makes this town so great.  Locally made items for sale, and a unique alternative to mass production.

The type of character that makes this town so great. Locally made items for sale, and a unique alternative to mass production.

Don’t hassle the Hoff.  Baldwin beach, and the idyllic palm you’ve been waiting for.

Don’t hassle the Hoff. Baldwin beach, and the idyllic palm you’ve been waiting for.

This deserved a stop.

This deserved a stop.

It’s a funny feeling looking at the weather you are pedaling into and knowing you are willingly heading head first into a cataclysmic rain event.  The first wall of rain hit me by surprise when I was shooting a photo during a “it’s only sprinkling” sucker hole, and like actually believing anything a political puppet tells you, it was a shame on me moment that left me scrambling to put away my camera and batten down the hatches for the elements of what today was going to entail.

New directions sans Civ.

New directions sans Civ.

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Signs of the times.

Signs of the times.

Ireland with a warm ocean?

Ireland with a warm ocean?

Bianary code rejoice, no silver halide was harmed in the making of this photograph.

Bianary code rejoice, no silver halide was harmed in the making of this photograph.

Luckily it wasn’t all torrential rain, and I had a few breaks in the weather around picturesque Kahakuloa, with it’s dramatic windward landscape and the few stands selling banana bread on the side of the road.

The wheels in motion.

The wheels in motion.

Bike.  Sick of it yet?

Bike. Sick of it yet?

Looking over the shoulder at the scenery below.

Looking over the shoulder at the scenery below.

This is my kind of highway.  I hadn’t seen a car for an hour.

This is my kind of highway. I hadn’t seen a car for an hour.

This was a great road and felt light years away from the wizzing traffic and stoplights of Kahului. In between rain I enjoyed the view, and the narrow winding road cut into the rocky bluff hillside which wove its way through the numerous drainages that have been created via the combination of time and the perseverance of water.  The area is absolutely stunning, and the unstable weather added to the dramatic views that stretched out in front of me.

Looking towards the ocean, and the folding contours of the drainage leading into it.

Looking towards the ocean, and the folding contours of the drainage leading into it.

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Kahakuloa head in the background.  You can definitely scramble up this thing.

Kahakuloa head in the background. You can definitely scramble up this thing.

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A brief break in the rain.  no complaints.

A brief break in the rain. no complaints.

The route is jaw dropping at times.

The route is jaw dropping at times.

Lucky

Lucky

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Slipping around the corners.

Slipping around the corners.

I started looking for camp about 10 or so miles before Honolua Bay.  With dark approaching, being in a steep, exposed, area it wasn’t ideal camping conditions.  And the clouds looked like it was going to be a wet night.  Taking stock of what I saw, a sense of urgency started to creep into the situations.  Then I felt a drop.  I knew the clouds were about to unleash.  With the exposed landscape, I started looking and considering other options, checking under bridge support beams, looking for some solace from the impeding storm.

…and we have rain, mud, rocks, and a goat in the route.

…and we have rain, mud, rocks, and a goat in the route.

From Maui, with love.

From Maui, with love.

When worlds collide.

When worlds collide.

With 15 minutes till dark, I saw a sliver of a tin roof up a dirt road.  Took the turn to recon, and couldn’t believe what I saw:  a hunter check station with an overhang out of the wind, and a platform big enough to lay down the sleeping bag and reflector.  Jackpot.  I could have set the tarp as a wall from roof to platform, but seeing the conditions felt better laying on it so I could burrito up in it bivy sack style if winds changed.  No need.  It rained hard and I was dry.  I think that’s part of why I like this kind of travel so much.  It strips away a lot of the frivolous mumbo jumbo that it’s hard to not get caught up in, and is a great barometer for perspective to appreciate the little things.

This kind of bivouac is kind of like winning the lottery.

This kind of bivouac is kind of like winning the lottery.

10 Apr Adventure In A Box: Day 3 from Fairdale

Waking up to this is a great way to start the day.

Waking up to this is a great way to start the day.

Day 3 of our Adventure In A Box starts with our travelers waking up in a cave in Maui. Noah heads off back to work and Ryan picks up the trip solo. There is also a bow and arrow involved in todays story…day3

bBikes rock, and they roll.  That is so bad it’s almost funny. Wait, no it isn’t.

Bikes rock, and they roll. That is so bad it’s almost funny. Wait, no it isn’t.

Packing up.

Packing up.

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Noah.

Noah.

Flats happen. I realized that I could have gotten away with just a fork and not another tire lever to fix flats with the way these beads seated.  Live and learn.

Flats happen. I realized that I could have gotten away with just a fork and not another tire lever to fix flats with the way these beads seated. Live and learn.

Someone has put some time in.

Someone has put some time in.

Noah taking off, back to work for him.

Noah taking off, back to work for him.

Day Three

Day three started with Noah fixing another flat before making an early morning departure to leave the trip and go work. We had supplies to fix the tire but if you are ever in a really big bind, flatted out and have a pump but no tubes or patches one way that can work is to take the tube, cut it where the hole is, tie it in a good knot, and stretch it over the rim and re-inflate.  I’ve once seen this work so well that the person rode it for three days.

The solar oven setup.  Windshield reflector folded into a conical shape, with a pot sitting on three rocks (for hot air to circulate all the way around pot) inside an oven bag.

The solar oven setup. Windshield reflector folded into a conical shape, with a pot sitting on three rocks (for hot air to circulate all the way around pot) inside an oven bag.

I really liked the area I was in, and planned on spending the morning enjoying it.  I set up to cook my breakfast by placing the cook pot (painted black) on top of three rocks for air circulation, inside an oven bag and the windshield reflector I’d been sleeping on folded into a conical shape to reflect the sun.  I’ve built solar ovens in the past but this one was an experiment.  It ended up working very well, and breakfast was served!

Fun.

Fun.

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Shooting the bow with some tourist bike shots in for good measure.

Shooting the bow with some tourist bike shots in for good measure.

While things were heating up with breakfast, I wanted to play around with shooting the bow I had with me but I needed a target.  I ended up grabbing a pallet frame left over from the fire, finding an old tattered sheet that was laying around the area, stuffing that with tall grass I compacted inside the pallet frame to make an improvised hay bale and drawing a target on the sheet with a piece of charcoal from last nights fire.  Spent some time working on my aim, and then snapped a couple tourist memory photos of the setting.

The acoustics of the waves crashing on these rocks was incredible.

The acoustics of the waves crashing on these rocks was incredible.

Breakfast is served.  The solar oven works!

Breakfast is served. The solar oven works!

After an ocean swim and filling up my water bottle, the remaining water was used for a solar shower with the perforated cap I brought.

After an ocean swim and filling up my water bottle, the remaining water was used for a solar shower with the perforated cap I brought.

The arrow quiver made by drilling out the end cap of the bike rack displayed without a bike tube tensioning the arrows.

The arrow quiver made by drilling out the end cap of the bike rack displayed without a bike tube tensioning the arrows.

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What a day so far.

What a day so far.

Looking back on a beautiful section of road, with a dirt patch compression to keep you (and your cargo!) honest.

Looking back on a beautiful section of road, with a dirt patch compression to keep you (and your cargo!) honest.

After a quick swim in the ocean, I topped off my water bottle then switched out caps on the water bladder I’d brought to use the remaining water for a solar shower before getting back on the bike.  Once on the road, the route transitioned to fresh pavement, almost zero traffic, and expansive vistas.  You need to bad to appreciate the good, and after the road I was on last night, it felt great to be on smooth auto-pilot road conditions making it able to go fast and let your gaze wander at the same time.

In love with life this very moment.  open road and gorgeous views.  This is the way it goes, and goes, and.....

In love with life this very moment. open road and gorgeous views. This is the way it goes, and goes, and…..

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Scenics along the way, and a route in the background.

Scenics along the way, and a route in the background.

Opening it up and enjoying the ride.

Opening it up and enjoying the ride.

Cruisin......

Cruisin……

A bike, a bridge, and a hell of a canyon.

A bike, a bridge, and a hell of a canyon.

I don’t see any cops.

I don’t see any cops.

Yes please.  If I’d ever worn chamois butter this would probably make me reach for a 5 gallon bucket of it.

Yes please. If I’d ever worn chamois butter this would probably make me reach for a 5 gallon bucket of it.

That’s better.  You know this is fun.

That’s better. You know this is fun.

En route on the climb towards kula.

En route on the climb towards kula.

The Henry Fong store in Kula.  Are we really moving forward?

The Henry Fong store in Kula. Are we really moving forward?

The sign says so.

The sign says so.

Recharge if needed.

Recharge if needed.

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The route begins a slow, steady, arduous climb thousands of feet towards Kula.  Approaching Kula, the elevation gain affects the weather, and as things started to get greener as I approached Ulupalakua, It started to rain.  After Kula heading towards Makawao it started to really rain, and before I know it I’m in a torrential rainstorm, the kind of storm that you’ve seen before but still makes you think “holy shit it’s raining hard.”  Given the supplies I had with me, and the weather I decided to make a push as dusk was setting to lose as much elevation as I could before sleeping for the night.  Made it just outside Paia in rain so hard there is no way a camera was coming out.

Jazzed on the ride.  Thanks Ian Morris for the t-shirt.  Moments before the rains came.

Jazzed on the ride. Thanks Ian Morris for the t-shirt. Moments before the rains came.

9 Apr Adventure in a box: Day 2 Hana to Kaupo from Fairdale

Ryan with an early morning swim to rock face climb...

Ryan with an early morning swim to rock face climb…

Ryan with a BIG jump into the ocean below at Wainapanapa

Ryan with a BIG jump into the ocean below at Wainapanapa

Day Two
We took a quick cruise to Wainapanapa state park and I went for an early morning ocean swim out to a sea stack, which I could climb up the chossy volcanic rock to reach the top before jumping into the ocean below. A great way to start the day, and even better after we went for another swim in the freshwater caves close by.

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Back on the road and what a road it was.  Winding through some beautiful scenery, my focus was at times directed towards fallen mangos littering the road.  There isn’t much in the way of amenities along this route, but are a fair number of fruit stands and a couple eating options. fairdale_maui_worcester-69

This photo= life not sucking

This photo= life not sucking

Life could be worse.

Life could be worse.

Informational sign heading towards the freshwater caves at Wainapanapa.  Noah displaying his barefoot, air conditioned sun shelter technique of caping his jacket off his head.

Informational sign heading towards the freshwater caves at Wainapanapa. Noah displaying his barefoot, air conditioned sun shelter technique of caping his jacket off his head.

Noah getting a swim in the freshwater caves.

Noah getting a swim in the freshwater caves.

Back on the road towards Hana.

Back on the road towards Hana.

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Minimalist Thai dining in Hana, the only restaurant style  meal of the trip and well worth the $10!

Minimalist Thai dining in Hana, the only restaurant style meal of the trip and well worth the $10!

Thai food sounded great so it didn’t take our arms being twisted to get us to pull over.  Ten dollars well spent later, we were back on our way.  Hana is one of those small town hamlets that has a time capsule general store that has managed to eschew the modern, homogenized, chain store façade that it sometimes seems tough to get away from.  The bulletin board acts as a community hub, and their retail selection runs the gamut from ice cream to machetes.

Plenty of scenics along the way.

Plenty of scenics along the way.

Hasegawa general store pit stop.

Hasegawa general store pit stop.

Extensive machete selection

Extensive machete selection

And what a machete selection.  Part of the joy of traveling is the people and perspectives you meet along the way, and in the store I ran into a gentleman wearing a leather apron.  When asked what he had the apron on for, his smirked response of “what don’t I have it on for” served as a segue for a great conversation about his life in the area, and was an insight to the product-of-your-environment self-reliance often seen in people living on the outskirts.  I don’t know what it is, but the paradox of some small communities seems that even though it seems people gravitate towards these places or stay there after growing up to get away from or avoid the hustle and bustle, and quite frankly all the people of cities.  Yet these people often seem the most open to talk, and to listen.

The spoils

The spoils

You better believe it.

You better believe it.

Who needs Wal-Mart?

Who needs Wal-Mart?

Ice Cream never tasted so good.

Ice Cream never tasted so good.

Having a great conversation with out new friend who has spent his life in the area. Noah standing on his jacket because of the hot pavement.

Having a great conversation with out new friend who has spent his life in the area. Noah standing on his jacket because of the hot pavement.

The route was gorgeous.

The route was gorgeous.

The road straightened out for a stretch, and the sun was starting to get to us.  Noah decided to start wearing his jacket hood, with the jacket becoming a de facto cape to protect his body from the sun.  Barefoot.  Brilliant.

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Believe it.

Believe it.

Making more friends along the way.  This gentleman knew everyone who drove by.

Making more friends along the way. This gentleman knew everyone who drove by.

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Great views and great weather, with too many sights to make great time.  The phrase great time has never made much sense to me.  You can’t make time; you can only spend it wisely.

The views near Hamoa

The views near Hamoa

This is called a highway.

This is called a highway.

Cascading waterfalls continued to greet us as we pedaled.

Cascading waterfalls continued to greet us as we pedaled.

From here I did a pit stop to do a quick run up the Pipiwai trail which is managed by Haleakala National park, and is a very nice trail leading a couple miles through well built stone stairs, past a couple massive Banyon tress, and through board walked stands of bamboo leading towards a waterfall.  Obviously doing something like this means leaving your bike for a bit, and I didn’t have a lock with me.  Out of sight out of mind, I hid the bike and covered in with brush.  Problem solved.

The trail and towards Waimoku falls

The trail and towards Waimoku falls

A massive Banyon tree along the trail. Notice the growth from the limbs into the ground.

A massive Banyon tree along the trail. Notice the growth from the limbs into the ground.

The path board-walked through bamboo

The path board-walked through bamboo

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Some side road explanation lead to great views

Some side road explanation lead to great views

This is what Aloe looks like for those who don’t know, and is great for sunburn.

This is what Aloe looks like for those who don’t know, and is great for sunburn.

Laulima farms pitstop.

Laulima farms pitstop.

Back on the road, I took a couple scenic detours before arriving at Laulima farms and meeting back up with Noah.  It was the type of inviting place that you want to hang out.  Noah had made some friends and was playing a guitar.  I bought some local produce (real food) and set up for a game of chess to go with my cup of coffee.  High-class poverty!

I’ll take this over a Safeway anyday.

I’ll take this over a Safeway anyday.

With a Guitar pick tattoo you know noah was stoked to find this setup.

With a Guitar pick tattoo you know noah was stoked to find this setup.

Setting up for a game of chess with some of the fruitstand spoils at the helm.  Life could be worse...

Setting up for a game of chess with some of the fruitstand spoils at the helm. Life could be worse…

Wwho needs shoes.

Wwho needs shoes.

En route to Kaupo, part of the route followed can be seen in the background.

En route to Kaupo, part of the route followed can be seen in the background.

Wrapping past Kipahulu and towards Kaupo, the climate charges from a jungle type climate to drier landscape, without much in the way of amenities.  Thinking this was last stop with easy to get water, I filled the cordura water bladder I’d brought and wore it backpack style to have ample fresh water for where we were headed.  The road quality quickly changes here as well, and with light fading fast the trip took a figurative turn into adventure cycling mode.

Securcing the hi-tech cargo system, it’s going to be a bumpy ride.

Securcing the hi-tech cargo system, it’s going to be a bumpy ride.

Ryan on the route.  The large water bladder can be seen worn with webbing as pack straps.

Ryan on the route. The large water bladder can be seen worn with webbing as pack straps.

The road surface was alternating between the bone jarring stutter bumps of an un-graded dirt road and stretches of pavement that appeared to have been created solely by haphazardly throwing shovelfuls of asphalt onto the road for the last decade plus.  Adding fuel to the experience was the last of the light subsiding and I was the only one with a headlamp.  This is where the tire choice on the Weekender really stood out being a solid performer with anything that could be thrown at it.

Some scenics along the way.  Looking towards Haleakala.

Some scenics along the way. Looking towards Haleakala.

fairdale_maui_worcester-126 Needless to say, we were exited when we made it to a great spot to camp.  Poking around in the dark, we found an overhang (means not having to set up tarp, and can lay on it instead), a fire pit, and a couple pallets.  Talk about winning the lottery. fairdale_maui_worcester-128

The DIY soda can stove Ryan made in use cooking dinner with three tent stakes as a pot support.

The DIY soda can stove Ryan made in use cooking dinner with three tent stakes as a pot support.

I set up and used the soda can stove I’d made to cook dinner.  It is basically two can bottoms sandwiched together with an inner sleeve cut with fuel port notches allowing the  flame to come out of the holes that were poked into the can with an awl.  JB weld is the best way to put one together but this being a last minute version (I’d given away the last one I’d made) I used a piece of heat tape to seal the deal.  Dinner is served, campfire built and we fell asleep to the sound of waves crashing on rolling boulders.

Campfire as a great ending to a fun day.

Campfire as a great ending to a fun day.

8 Apr Adventure In Box: Maui Day 0-1 from Fairdale

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We’re very pleased to bring you a new Field Trip installment from beautiful Maui.  We sent Ryan Worcester a Weekender and he will be taking us along on his adventure around the island. He’ll be handling both the typing and camera work. We would be stoked if you read this and got inspired to buy a Fairdale, but to be entirely honest, we’d be even happier if we inspired you to get out there and take your own adventure. Ryan is a master of making do with what’s available and he’ll show us all how to travel without the stress of overthinking and over planning. Read on and enjoy the amazing images…

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Adventure In a Box by Ryan Worcester

Day Zero.

Everything starts somewhere, especially something that in hindsight you’d call an adventure.  This particular journey started with a box.  Two of them to be exact.  The first one came in the form of a cardboard box (with the graphic of an animal that had the desire to say something important).  Inside this box from Fairdale was a drop bar Weekender, and coupled with it came an opportunity to spend five days pedaling around Maui, Hawaii.  An endeavor like this requires some supplies, hence the second box.

Adventure in a box (well two).

Adventure in a box (well two).

First things first, the bike had to be built.  Pretty simple procedure, and gives you some time to get to know the bike.  I was impressed with how well suited this bike was for what I was about to do, looked great, fit great and had really nice geometry for this kind of bike.  After the obligatory first ride with some wrenches in your pocket to adjust this, tighten that etc. it was time to focus on the cargo.

The bike.

The bike.

Every trip, however short, has with it a unique set of challenges, and supplies needed.  As for the supplies, I think that living in today’s bright lights and flashing advertisement fear driven marketing escapade, it’s easy to think there are a million things that you absolutely need to have to go on an adventure.  So we buy a bunch of things to do whatever it is that you want to do, then head out to do it stuffed to the gills with whatever they convince us that we absolutely need to do xyz, or we will suffer, or die, or we won’t fit in, or whatever angle it is they use, to make you think you can’t do something unless it is this way.  Some of these things you buy can be incredibly useful.  To go on a bike trip like this, a bike is obviously needed, and you could do a lot worse than the Fairdale Weekender in that department.  As much as it would have been comforting to have high end waterproof saddlebags, and all the latest gear, gadgets and gizmos for a ride like this it would have probably cost me a couple thousand dollars I don’t have.  So I was back to the “make the most of what you have” Plan B that usually turns out to be more entertaining anyway, and usually acts as proof that if you put some work in, there is always another way.  I say that because I’d hate to see someone not do something like this or something else they really wanted to do because they didn’t have the means to do so.  Anyway, I decided to trust the cargo to a seat post mounted bike rack.  The aforementioned cargo box is a wine box that was given to me by a man named Gregory, who’s a type of priorities in order cyclist owning a bike that more than likely is worth more than his car, always positive, and riding whenever possible.  After thanking him for the box, it was time to get to work on it.  I first reinforced the bottom of the box with an additional piece of plywood to address something I thought could go wrong before it did go wrong.  Expoy was applied to the seams to ensure they wouldn’t rattle apart. I put a couple brackets I had laying around on the lid to reinforce the weak lid seam, and stained the box, then bolted it to the rack with hardware.  Hinges have been put on the lid, and once installed the box adjusted for rider position and height so as when the lid hinges open it rests flat on the seat, and can be used as a cutting board, to organize gear, or whatever. To top it off I painted a chessboard on the inside of the lid.  Time to pack.

The kit to fit the wine box.

The kit to fit the wine box.

Packing for any trip is a triple Venn diagram of what you want to bring, what you need to bring, and what you are willing to carry.  For this trip my cargo from left to right as pictured is:

1: Bow: Lightweight three piece take down recurve bow.  Possibly one of the most superfluous items I’ve ever brought on a bike ride, but it sounded like a good idea, and if you can’t laugh at yourself whom can you laugh at?

2: Arrows for bow.  The end of the rack has been drilled out to act as a quiver for the arrows, which rest up against the seat post buffered by a piece of padding, and tensioned in place via a recycled tube.

3: Rain fly.  9’x10.’  This came into my possession years ago when I was fighting forest fires for the U.S. forest service.  Thanks Uncle Sam!

4: Synthetic sleeping bag.  Cheap and very thin, even for Hawaii, depending on location.  The plan is to augment this with a hat and shirt if needed.

5: Accessory cord.  Useful for a lot of things, including setting up a tarp as shelter in different configurations if needed.

6: Extra cotton t-shirt.  They say cotton kills and I’m ready to party.

7: Long sleeve half zip thin base layer.

8: Rain shell.

9: Pennies, with cut out chess piece shapes taped to them for an idea of how to have small (almost free) packable chess pieces that wont blow away, to pair up with the chessboard painted on the wine box.

10: mini pump with hose.  I strongly recommend these small style pumps that have a short flexible hose to connect to the valve.  They put less stress on the valve stem and are way easier to use.  You can you without a lot on a bike trip, but it takes a pretty big cowboy to not take a pump. Flats happen.

11: Tubes. Two tubes.

12: Patch kit.  Patching tubes is less wasteful, costs less, and you don’t have to take your wheel off.

13: Hat.  Head warm and padding for the camera.

14: Headlamp.  Dark happens.

15: Multi tool.  I was at a bike event years ago and some car company was handing these out, I’m assuming in hopes it would make people who ride bikes like their cars.  Kind of funny isn’t it?

16: single tire lever

17: Aluminum tent stakes, for setting up shelter and for using as cook pot stand.

18: Two Voile straps.  If you aren’t coming from a ski background, there is a good chance you’ve never heard of these.  They are a simple, light, strong, cam strap with a little elasticity that can be used for almost anything.

19: pocket knife, Swiss army style.  I kind of hate these knifes, given their small main blade size, but the last flight I was on I forgot my main pocket knife was in the waist belt of my daypack and was assimilated by TSA.  Whoops.  I’m an idiot, and have been managing since.

20: Iodine tablets with ascorbic acid (vitamin C) neutralizer.  Water treatment or filtration isn’t nearly as big a concern on a pavement based bicycle tour compared to some other trips but are a good backup, and light enough to be worth the insurance to avoid brain splitting dehydration headaches because you are afraid to drink the water.

21: Soap. No explanation needed. I hope.

22: Camera kit: Camera with two lenses, two batteries, and cheap wireless shutter release to shoot some photos on a solo bike trip.

23: Three dry bags.  One to keep my sleeping bag in a plastic bag dry at all costs., others for important (IE camera) gear dry.

24: Fork. Chosen because handle is good shape to use as second tire lever.

25:  home made DIY camp stove made midnight day zero out of soda cans.  These are popular with long distance hikers for their lightweight and no moving parts to break.  I’ll shoot a couple photos of it in use along the way.

26: small bottle of denatured alcohol as stove fuel.

27: lighter, also not pictured additional lighter.  Backup fire source recommended.

28: small cheap camp cook pot I’ve had for 10 years that has been spray-painted black for solar cooking.

29: Cordura hydration bladder, with webbing straps to carry as backpack if long distance water portaging is needed.

30: additional cap for bladder perforated with holes to be used as camp solar shower

31: toothpaste/toothbrush.

32: windshield reflector  (Mylar laminated bubblewrap style) cut to box width to be used as sleeping pad, as well as folded into conical shape to set up a solar cook oven with an oven bag.

Couple hours of sleep and tomorrow is time to pedal.

The journey starts from Paia Bay.

The journey starts from Paia Bay.

Day One.

Plans change.  I’d made plans and preparations for this to be a 5 day solo trip, but at the last minute I ran into Noah DeLea, whom conveyed that he had a couple days off and was down for a pedal.  Scramble mode.  We took another seat post bike rack that was sitting around  ($20 if they aren’t), and zip tied a milk crate to the rack.  Supplies inside a trash bag, cargo was set.  Noah is a Maine to Maui transplant, and has a certain ability to suffer with a smile that is a great quality in a travel partner.  Turns out Noah didn’t really want to ride in the boots he had so he made the decision to ride barefoot.  Possibly not the best idea in the world, but that’s probably why it sounded like such a good one.  A couple rounds of duct tape over the pedals to not meat cleave his feet, and we had a pedal solution at a weight much less than a carbon soled/clipless combo.  Shorts circuit.   And it was go time.

Weekender OG and Weekender Drop Disc with simple seat post racks and boxes.

Weekender OG and Weekender Drop Disc with simple seat post racks and boxes.

The pedal started in the town of Paia, which is about 7 miles from the airport.  Paia is a once sugarcane town turned into one quirky small towns magnetized for eccentric energy, and a lot of good people.  After a quick pit stop at Paia Bay, we started heading east on the Hana highway.  Passing the famous Ho’okipa surf break and the open pastures in the area, the switch instantly flipped from the pre-trip plan scramble to simply riding a bike down the road on a beautiful day.  The focus of the trip if you haven’t gathered is fun over miles, and we were treating it as such.  Cruising down the road on a beautiful day, nice road, scenic sights, good bike.  Lucky to be alive.

Noah Delea tagging along.

Noah Delea tagging along.

Heading east on the Hana highway, past the signs to Haiku and the hiking trails accessible as you pass Twin Falls, a couple things happen.  The development starts to ebb, the road gets narrower, and it starts to get greener.

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Due to a lot of factors such as location, trade winds, and topography, there is a lot of diversity in landscape on Maui.  after pausing at some large Rainbow Eucalyptus trees (Noah works as an arborist and was a great source of tree info), we continued east, before pulling off the road to explore an area off the side of the road.

Enroute stopping at some Rainbow Eucalyptus trees on the Hana Highway.

Enroute stopping at some Rainbow Eucalyptus trees on the Hana Highway.

Noah with a pedal system lighter than carbon soled spds. Barefoot and duct tape.  He didn’t bring shoes.  The medium is the message.

Noah with a pedal system lighter than carbon soled spds. Barefoot and duct tape. He didn’t bring shoes. The medium is the message.

Would saying Noah is stoked on being pumped cause a Mutiny?

Would saying Noah is stoked on being pumped cause a Mutiny?

Drop bar weekender ready to get broken in proper.

Drop bar weekender ready to get broken in proper.

Noah a skilled arborist, at home in his domain.

Noah a skilled arborist, at home in his domain.

Exploring a trail we found off the road.

Exploring a trail we found off the road.

Starting off as a trail cut as a swath through the brush, it came to a series of ropes we came to a series of ropes to aid the decent to the rugged shoreline below.  With the Azure waves acting as a powerful crashing contrast to the rocks and cliffs surrounding us, it was a view worth taking in, and was worth the effort it took to get to.  Tourist shots were taken, then we started the climb back up to the road.  Back on the Bikes and back on the road.

Noah and a view that would have knocked his socks off, were he wearing any.

Noah and a view that would have knocked his socks off, were he wearing any.

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um.yeah

Ddecending a rope system to a rugged coastline.

Ddecending a rope system to a rugged coastline.

Exploring the rocky coastline with crashing waves and expansive views.

Exploring the rocky coastline with crashing waves and expansive views.

Hunkering down as powerful waves come crashing in.

Hunkering down as powerful waves come crashing in.

From here the road really started to choke out, and turn into an anything but a straight-line type chicaning route that seemed to have a surprise around every corner.  It’s funny how much speed can affect an experience in the sense of being on a bike versus a car for a journey on this road forces you to slow down and probably see a lot more in the process.  The tangled ribbon of pavement brought us through a bamboo forest, over single lane bridges, and by numerous waterfalls lining the road.

The narrow winding road with countless single lane bridges.

The narrow winding road with countless single lane bridges.

Our tour guide, Ryan Worcester.

Our tour guide, Ryan Worcester.

Expansive bamboo forest looming above the road.

Expansive bamboo forest looming above the road.

Bike maintenance happens.

Bike maintenance happens.

Ryan and a roadside cliff jump with a thread the needle landing to cool off.

Ryan and a roadside cliff jump with a thread the needle landing to cool off.

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Noah taking the dip.

Noah taking the dip.

The route with countless bridges and waterfalls was astounding.

The route with countless bridges and waterfalls was astounding.

Countless vistas lined the route.

Countless vistas lined the route.

A picnic spot if I’ve ever seen one.

A picnic spot if I’ve ever seen one.

Flats happen, and Noah had his first taste, but the refreshing reward was a roadside jump into a thread the needle sweet spot of freshwater below.  Refreshed and recharged, we rolled just outside of Hana to camp for the night.  What a day.

What a day.

What a day.

 

8 Apr Adventure In a Box: Day 0 Essential Bike Touring Gear (bow n’ arrow, chess board, ect..) from Fairdale

We’re very pleased to bring you a new Field Trip installment from beautiful Maui.  We sent Ryan Worcester a Weekender and he will be taking us along on his adventure around the island. He’ll be handling both the typing and camera work. We would be stoked if you read this and got inspired to buy a Fairdale, but to be entirely honest, we’d be even happier if we inspired you to get out there and take your own adventure. Ryan is a master of making do with what’s available and he’ll show us all how to travel without the stress of overthinking and over planning. Read on and enjoy the amazing images…

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Adventure In a Box by Ryan Worcester

Day Zero.

Everything starts somewhere, especially something that in hindsight you’d call an adventure.  This particular journey started with a box.  Two of them to be exact.  The first one came in the form of a cardboard box (with the graphic of an animal that had the desire to say something important).  Inside this box from Fairdale was a drop bar Weekender, and coupled with it came an opportunity to spend five days pedaling around Maui, Hawaii.  An endeavor like this requires some supplies, hence the second box.

Adventure in a box (well two).

Adventure in a box (well two).

Adventure in a box (well two).

First things first, the bike had to be built.  Pretty simple procedure, and gives you some time to get to know the bike.  I was impressed with how well suited this bike was for what I was about to do, looked great, fit great and had really nice geometry for this kind of bike.  After the obligatory first ride with some wrenches in your pocket to adjust this, tighten that etc. it was time to focus on the cargo.

Every trip, however short, has with it a unique set of challenges, and supplies needed.  As for the supplies, I think that living in today’s bright lights and flashing advertisement fear driven marketing escapade, it’s easy to think there are a million things that you absolutely need to have to go on an adventure.  So we buy a bunch of things to do whatever it is that you want to do, then head out to do it stuffed to the gills with whatever they convince us that we absolutely need to do xyz, or we will suffer, or die, or we won’t fit in, or whatever angle it is they use, to make you think you can’t do something unless it is this way.  Some of these things you buy can be incredibly useful.  To go on a bike trip like this, a bike is obviously needed, and you could do a lot worse than the Fairdale Weekender in that department.  As much as it would have been comforting to have high end waterproof saddlebags, and all the latest gear, gadgets and gizmos for a ride like this it would have probably cost me a couple thousand dollars I don’t have.  So I was back to the “make the most of what you have” Plan B that usually turns out to be more entertaining anyway, and usually acts as proof that if you put some work in, there is always another way.  I say that because I’d hate to see someone not do something like this or something else they really wanted to do because they didn’t have the means to do so.  Anyway, I decided to trust the cargo to a seat post mounted bike rack.  The aforementioned cargo box is a wine box that was given to me by a man named Gregory, who’s a type of priorities in order cyclist owning a bike that more than likely is worth more than his car, always positive, and riding whenever possible.  After thanking him for the box, it was time to get to work on it.  I first reinforced the bottom of the box with an additional piece of plywood to address something I thought could go wrong before it did go wrong.  Expoy was applied to the seams to ensure they wouldn’t rattle apart. I put a couple brackets I had laying around on the lid to reinforce the weak lid seam, and stained the box, then bolted it to the rack with hardware.  Hinges have been put on the lid, and once installed the box adjusted for rider position and height so as when the lid hinges open it rests flat on the seat, and can be used as a cutting board, to organize gear, or whatever. To top it off I painted a chessboard on the inside of the lid.  Time to pack.

The kit to fit the wine box.

The kit to fit the wine box.

The kit to fit the wine box.

Packing for any trip is a triple Venn diagram of what you want to bring, what you need to bring, and what you are willing to carry.  For this trip my cargo from left to right as pictured is:

1: Bow: Lightweight three piece take down recurve bow.  Possibly one of the most superfluous items I’ve ever brought on a bike ride, but it sounded like a good idea, and if you can’t laugh at yourself whom can you laugh at?

2: Arrows for bow.  The end of the rack has been drilled out to act as a quiver for the arrows, which rest up against the seat post buffered by a piece of padding, and tensioned in place via a recycled tube.

3: Rain fly.  9’x10.’  This came into my possession years ago when I was fighting forest fires for the U.S. forest service.  Thanks Uncle Sam!

4: Synthetic sleeping bag.  Cheap and very thin, even for Hawaii, depending on location.  The plan is to augment this with a hat and shirt if needed.

5: Accessory cord.  Useful for a lot of things, including setting up a tarp as shelter in different configurations if needed.

6: Extra cotton t-shirt.  They say cotton kills and I’m ready to party.

7: Long sleeve half zip thin base layer.

8: Rain shell.

9: Pennies, with cut out chess piece shapes taped to them for an idea of how to have small (almost free) packable chess pieces that wont blow away, to pair up with the chessboard painted on the wine box.

10: mini pump with hose.  I strongly recommend these small style pumps that have a short flexible hose to connect to the valve.  They put less stress on the valve stem and are way easier to use.  You can you without a lot on a bike trip, but it takes a pretty big cowboy to not take a pump. Flats happen.

11: Tubes. Two tubes.

12: Patch kit.  Patching tubes is less wasteful, costs less, and you don’t have to take your wheel off.

13: Hat.  Head warm and padding for the camera.

14: Headlamp.  Dark happens.

15: Multi tool.  I was at a bike event years ago and some car company was handing these out, I’m assuming in hopes it would make people who ride bikes like their cars.  Kind of funny isn’t it?

16: single tire lever

17: Aluminum tent stakes, for setting up shelter and for using as cook pot stand.

18: Two Voile straps.  If you aren’t coming from a ski background, there is a good chance you’ve never heard of these.  They are a simple, light, strong, cam strap with a little elasticity that can be used for almost anything.

19: pocket knife, Swiss army style.  I kind of hate these knifes, given their small main blade size, but the last flight I was on I forgot my main pocket knife was in the waist belt of my daypack and was assimilated by TSA.  Whoops.  I’m an idiot, and have been managing since.

20: Iodine tablets with ascorbic acid (vitamin C) neutralizer.  Water treatment or filtration isn’t nearly as big a concern on a pavement based bicycle tour compared to some other trips but are a good backup, and light enough to be worth the insurance to avoid brain splitting dehydration headaches because you are afraid to drink the water.

21: Soap. No explanation needed. I hope.

22: Camera kit: Camera with two lenses, two batteries, and cheap wireless shutter release to shoot some photos on a solo bike trip.

23: Three dry bags.  One to keep my sleeping bag in a plastic bag dry at all costs., others for important (IE camera) gear dry.

24: Fork. Chosen because handle is good shape to use as second tire lever.

25:  home made DIY camp stove made midnight day zero out of soda cans.  These are popular with long distance hikers for their lightweight and no moving parts to break.  I’ll shoot a couple photos of it in use along the way.

26: small bottle of denatured alcohol as stove fuel.

27: lighter, also not pictured additional lighter.  Backup fire source recommended.

28: small cheap camp cook pot I’ve had for 10 years that has been spray-painted black for solar cooking.

29: Cordura hydration bladder, with webbing straps to carry as backpack if long distance water portaging is needed.

30: additional cap for bladder perforated with holes to be used as camp solar shower

31: toothpaste/toothbrush.

32: windshield reflector  (Mylar laminated bubblewrap style) cut to box width to be used as sleeping pad, as well as folded into conical shape to set up a solar cook oven with an oven bag.

Couple hours of sleep and tomorrow is time to pedal.

7 Apr Field trip: Tour of Maui from Fairdale

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Starting tomorrow Ryan Worcester will taking us along for a 5 day bicycle field trip around Maui. Can’t wait to see the places he ends up and photos he takes. 5iMt6SrCQ6FXM1bzcbKvDVlg2Ny1MvHQ9Vju_owGlAw

 

1 Apr The Stud Bike from Fairdale

Fairdale is excited to announce that the first bike from our 2015 lineup has arrived early. The Stud is exactly what it sounds like it would be, the toughest and most bad ass bike we have ever made. Wind tunnel tested for the maximum aerodynamic rider position and designed to be equally at home on the streets or off road. We’ve all heard of the “so-called” benefits of Carbon Fiber frames, but our 100% pure Pine stud main frame advances bike building to the next level. Compliant in all the best ways, 100% made and grown in the USA our elegant weld-less frame construction looks as good as it performs. Our test riders were able to reach top speeds of over 19 kilometers an hour, which we are told converts to over 85MPH! To compliment this masterpiece of design The Stud comes with the finest quality components. Our custom designed memory foam seat cushion will keep you happy on even the longest rides, and the comfortable prone riding position is very similar to lying in a plush feather bed. The Stud frame has infinite mounting points for water bottle cages and touring racks. Pre-order today and be the first in your area to be seen riding The Stud!

Learn how The Stud was created in our R+D video.

Complete Bike: $999
Frame Only: $6
Frame Only (Di2 Compatible): $6.10

Coming Soon:

Auto Roof rack adapter: $1599
Special Edition Chrome The Stud Frame: $999

The Lil’ Stud (for BMX racing and trick jumping) arrives in fall of 2014.

Full specs and geometry here: The Stud

21 Mar Fairdale R+D from Fairdale

Fairdale Bikes presents a little insight into its highly advanced R & D department. Aerodynamic 2×4 bikes and Fender Bass Bicycle are all put to the test.

TEST RIDERS: Taj + Leif
STUNT DOG: Monty
CAMERA + EDIT: Francis

20 Mar Thanks URBAN CYCLIST from Fairdale

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Urban Cyclist magazine reviewed our UK Spec Coaster and previewed our Goodship road bike. Thanks very much guys, we appreciate it very much! Click on to read their write up or better yet go subscribe to the mag here.

PDF: Coaster in Urban Cyclist

PDF: Goodship in Urban Cyclist